Authors & Presenters for Sunday

< Saturday Lineup

Click on the Author's name to access their complete biography and links.

Manulani Aluli-Meyer

Panel: Buddhism, Christianity, and Hawaiian Spirituality
1 pm Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Dr. Manulani Aluli Meyer is the fifth daughter of Emma Aluli and Harry Meyer. Her family hails from Mokapu, Kailua, Wailuku, Hilo and Kohala on the islands of Oahu, Maui and Moku O Keawe. The Aluli ohana is a large and diverse group of scholar-activists who have spent their lives in Hawaiian education, justice, land reclamation, health, cultural revitalization, arts education, prison reform, transformational economics, food sovereignty, Hawaiian philosophy and most of all, music.

Kimo Armitage

Panel: Peace Through Words and Pictures.
10 a.m. Sunday May 1,
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Kimo Armitage is a poet, best-selling children's book author, playwright and videographer. He is from Hale'iwa, O'ahu, where his maternal grandparents raised him. He recently received his doctoral degree from the English Department at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. His area of concentration is creative writing with a focus in creative writing pedagogy, literature of Hawaiʻi, and literature of the Pacific. He has published over 20 books and has edited numerous anthologies.

Helen Baroni

Panel: Diamond Sangha Zen in Hawaiʻi
Noon May 1.
Buddhism Pavillion

Helen Baroni, Ph.D. Columbia University, is Professor and past Chair in the Department of Religion, UH Manoa, historian of Zen in Japan, and the author of Love, Roshi: Robert Baker Aitken and His Distant Correspondents, among other publications.

Patricia Brown

Panel: Filipina Writers in Hawaii: Not Just Nurses, Caregivers, Beauty Queens
3 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Dr. Patricia Brown is a therapist, researcher; Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS) Trustee, founder and executive administrator of FANHS Hawai’i State Chapter; Second Vice-President, Hawai’i Plantation Village; past Chaminade University’s School Counseling Graduate Internship Director, California K-12+ educator and school psychologist. Her list of books includes KULA SAN: Maui’s Healing Place, FILIPINAS! Voices from Daughters and Descendants of Hawaii’s Plantation Era, and her current project HAWAII’S FILIPINAS and FILIPINOS—Heart to Heart Stories —1906-2016.

Amalia Bueno

Panel: Filipina Writers in Hawaii: Not Just Nurses, Caregivers, Beauty Queens
3 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Amalia Bueno writes poetry and fiction. Her work has been published in journals, anthologies and magazines. Amalia’s inaugural poetry chapbook, Home Remedies, was published in 2014 (Finishing Line Press). Awarded the Ian Macmillan Poetry Prize in 2013,  she is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, where she teaches composition and creative writing. Her research interests include Filipina diasporic literature, creative writing pedagogy, and poetry in the prisons.

Nicholas Buettner

4 p.m. Sunday May 1,
Mission Memorial Auditorium

Nick Buettner was Executive Producer of the Blue Zones expeditions to Okinawa, Costa Rica and Ikaria -- places that have the greatest life expectancy and where more people reach age 100 than anywhere else in the world. As a leader on the Blue Zones team, Nick led all field operations and collaborated with Good Morning America, CNN, AOL, WCCO and the National Geographic Channel. He is a Blue Zone Team representative for the Blue Zone Projects, with the goal of taking the lessons learned in the Blue Zones and bring them to communities in the United States.

Zoe FitzGerald Carter

11 a.m. Sunday May 1
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Zoe FitzGerald Carter is a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and has written for The New York Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, Newsweek, and Vogue. Her memoir, Imperfect Endings: A Daughter’s Story of Love, Loss, and Letting Go was excerpted in O magazine, chosen as a finalist for the National MS Society's Books for a Better Life Award, and was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writer's pick. Zoe teaches memoir at the San Francisco Writers Grotto and plays in an indie folk band called Sugartown. 

Castle Performing Arts Center

Thoroughly Modern Millie
Noon, Sunday May 1,
Keiki Stage

The Castle Performing Arts Learning Center has been producing quality entertainment and education for 53 years on Windward Oahu. A Hawaii DOE designated Learning Center public school students from all over Oahu come to take acting, play production, technical theater and dance classes, including tap and ballet - both during the school day as well as after school hours. Each year full scale productions include a drama or comedy, an educational touring show, our KidStart production for grades 5-8, an annual dance concert and a full stage musical! All productions are staged at the Ronald E. Bright Theatre and are open to the public! Come see what the public schools do right! Karen Meyer is the director.

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Virgie Chattergy

Panel: Filipina Writers in Hawaii: Not Just Nurses, Caregivers, Beauty Queens
3 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Virgie Chattergy, Professor Emeritus from UH Manoa, she received her postgraduate degrees from UCLA. She was born, raised and educated in Cebu, Philippines where she received a degree in elementary education from St. Theresa’s College. She pioneered the inclusion of language sensitivity and cultural diversity in education programs at UH Manoa at a time when the idea was new. Her involvement led to a variety of awards including “Leadership in Asia/Pacific Island Education” from the NEA.

Julie Checkoway

10 a.m. Sunday, May 1.
Mission Memorial Auditorium

Julie Checkoway is an author and documentary filmmaker. She graduated from Harvard College, the Iowa Writers Workshop, and the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars. She is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts individual artist grant and fellowships at writers' colonies, including Yaddo. Her writing has appeared in theNew York Times, Salt Lake Tribune, andHuffington Post.

Stuart Holmes Coleman

10 a.m. Sunday May 1. Authors Mauka Pavilion

Stuart Holmes Coleman is the author of Eddie Would Go, Fierce Heart and more than 60 published articles and poems. His newest book is called Eddie Aikau: Hawaiian Hero (Bess Press, 2016). Along with the Eliot Cades Award for Literature, he has won writing fellowships at The Mesa Refuge, The Norman Mailer Center, and Vaughan Park in New Zealand. Coleman has taught writing, literature and leadership at Punahou and Iolani Schools, the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center. He currently works as the Hawaii Manager of the Surfrider Foundation.

Kathy Collins

Storytelling
11 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday April 30.
12:30-2 pm Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

Actress, storyteller, broadcaster and freelance writer Kathy Collins began performing at the age of 13. Raised on Maui, she often calls on her pidgin-speaking alter ego, “Tita,” during her weeklystorytelling sessions at Makena Resort. Collins and Tita have performed at festivals across the U.S. and Canada, including the Lincoln Center Out of Doors Project in New York City.

David Davis

Noon, Sunday May 1,
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Award-winning journalist David Davis is the author of “Waterman: The Life and Times of Duke Kahanamoku,” the definitive biography of swimmer-surfer-Olympian Duke Kahanamoku, one of the greatest and most unsung figures in American sports annals. Also “Showdown at Shepherd's Bush: The 1908 Olympic Marathon and the Three Runners Who Launched a Sporting Craze;” and “Play By Play: Los Angeles Sports Photography: 1889-1989.” His writing has been anthologized in “The Best American Sports Writing” series. Currently, he is a contributing writer at Los Angeles Magazine and a contributing editor at “SportsLetter.” He lives in Los Angeles.

Diamond Head Theatre Shooting Stars

11 a.m. Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

Under the direction of Diamond Head Theatre’s award- winning Artistic Director John Rampage and his talented staff, the Diamond Head Theatre Shooting Stars feature some of Hawaii’s most talented performers, ages 7-17. The Shooting Stars have entertained audiences for over 20 years with an extensive repertoire of show tunes and choreography. They have performed in New York at City Center, as well as locally at Washington Place, Hilton Hawaiian village, in Jim Nabors’ Christmas show, at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser’s ‘Ilima Awards, and with the Honolulu Symphony. The Shooting Stars have also staged their own productions of Little Shop of Horrors, Damn Yankees, Cinderella, Hello, Dolly!, Into the Woods, Hairspray, and 42nd Street. This is their 11th appearance at the Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival.

James Dooley

2 p.m. Sunday May 1, 
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Raised in San Francisco and the Bay Area, James Dooley worked as a United Press International reporter in Honolulu in 1973 and a year later joined the staff of the Honolulu Advertiser, where he was an investigative reporter for nearly two decades. After five years at Honolulu's KITV News, Dooley returned to the Advertiser in 2002 and moved to online reporting at Hawaii Reporter in 2010. He retired in 2012.

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Timothy Dyke

Readings: Tinfish Poets.
3 p.m. Sunday May 1,
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Timothy Dyke lives with parrots in Honolulu, Hawaii. He teaches high school students and writes poems, essays and stories. In 2012 he earned an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Arizona. His chapbook, Awkward Hugger, was published by Tinfish Press in 2015. Tinfish will also publish his collection of linked prose poems, The Homosexual Agenda, in 2017. 

Therese Fitzgerald

Panel: Socially Engaged Buddhism
2 pm Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Therese Fitzgerald is a Zen Buddhist minister who lives on Maui, where she worked as Assistant Chaplain at Maui Community Correctional Center and is now Spiritual Care Counselor at Hospice Maui. She was ordained by Richard Baker-Roshi in 1986 and by Thich Nhat Hanh in 1994, and leads meditation retreats worldwide. She served as Executive Director of the Buddhist Peace Fellowship, was cofounder of the Community of Mindful Living, and helped Maxine Hong Kingston start the Veterans Writing Group.

Lisa Freeman

Panel: Two YA novelists
2 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

Lisa Freeman is an author from Santa Monica, California only miles from State Beach, where her novel Honey Girl takes place. She grew up amidst the Hollywood scene and emerged as an actor in films like Back to the Future and Mr. Mom. Here her love for storytelling was born. Lisa’s YA debut, Honey Girl, was published in 2015, and she’s currently writing the sequel, Sisters of the Sand, which will hit shelves Spring 2017. 

 

Jesse Maceo Vega Frey

Panel: Buddhist Meditation and the Rise of Mindfulness
3 pm Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Jesse Maceo Vega Frey moved to the Island of Hawai‘i in 2011 to serve as key support for the Hawai‘i Island and O‘ahu sangha. As a teacher of Vipassana (insight) meditation within the broader context of the Theravadan Buddhist tradition he loves guiding students in practices such as the Brahma Viharas and the 4 Protections and is especially moved to help deepen their relationship to sila as an unending exploration of ethical integrity. His teaching aims to inspire the skills, determination, and faith necessary to realize the deepest human freedom.

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Jeff Gere

Keiki Stage: Storytelling
Saturday April 30 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sunday May 1, Noon-2p.m.

Jeff Gere blends talents as painter, puppeteer, and mime into performances which have electrified audiences in Hawaii for 25 years. Jeff's physical energy, morphing elastic face and voice characterizations make his shows events. Jeff becomes his stories! 

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M. Thomas Gammarino

4 p.m. Sunday May 1
Authors Mauka Pavilion

M. Thomas Gammarino is the author of the novels King of the Worlds and Big in Japan, and the novella Jellyfish Dreams. His short fiction has appeared in The New York Tyrant, Tinfish, Word Riot, and The Hawai'i Review (among others), and he received the 2013 Elliot Cades Award for Literature. He lives in Honolulu with his wife and kids.

Josh Booth Green MD

Josh Green is a physician and Hawaii State Senator. He was educated at Swarthmore college and then went on receive his medical degree from Penn State. After finishing medical school, Josh worked as a volunteer physician in South African missionary hospitals, treating rural populations overwhelmed by AIDS and malaria. Upon completion of his residency training in Family Medicine, Josh accepted a position in the National Health Corps to practice medicine in under-served areas of Hawaii and in 2009 was named Hawaii Physician of the Year. He was elected to the Hawaii State House of Representatives in 2004 and served for four years before being elected to the Senate in 2008 where he has served as the Health Committee Chair. He is currently serving as the Senate’s Majority Floor Leader and Whip, and is also an emergency room doctor on the Big Island. Josh married Jamie Ushiroda in 2006 and they are the proud parents of Maia (9) and Sam (5).

Joseph Han

Readings from Tinfish
3 pm Sunday May 1 Authors Mauka Pavilion

Joseph Han was born in Seoul, Korea and raised in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. His fiction and poetry have recently appeared in journals such as Bamboo Ridge Press, Word Riot, CURA: A Literary Magazine of Art & Action, Cha: An Asian Literary Journal, Eclectica Magazine, and Hawaiʻi Pacific Review. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in English at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, where he received the 2015 Academy of American Poets Prize, and the 2015 Biography Prize. He is the author of a chapbook, Orphan (Tinfish Press, 2015).

Hawaii Theatre Center Young Actors Ensemble

Play: Othel-lolo!
4:30 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

0thel-lolo-- an abbreviated (think Monty Python meets Reduced Shakespeare) version of the full length production of Othello presented onstage at the Hawaii Theatre by the Hawaii Theatre Young Actors Ensemble. This high-energy band of Elizabethan Players will undertake to deliver the gist of Shakespeare’s famous tragedy in a 25-minute rendition. Directed by Eden-Lee Murray.

Christina Hellmich

Panel: Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Na Hulu Ali‘i
2:30 Sunday May 1.
Mission Memorial Auditorium

Christina Hellmich joined the staff of the newly re-opened de Young Museum in 2005. She has served as Curator in Charge of the department of the arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas since 2011. Her area of expertise is Oceanic visual culture. In her curatorial role she organizes and collaborates on exhibitions, publications, and public programs. The exhibition, Embodiments: Masterworks of African Figurative Sculpture, opened at the deYoung in late January. Hellmich co-edited the catalogue with Manuel Jordán. Her current exhibition is Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nā Hulu Ali‘i developed in partnership with the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu featuring 75 rare and stunning examples of this unique Hawaiian art form. She co-edited the accompanying exhibition catalogue.

Kaui Hart Hemmings

Panel: Two YA novelists
2 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

Kaui Hart Hemmings was born and raised in Hawaii. She has degrees from Colorado College and Sarah Lawrence and was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University. Her first novel, THE DESCENDANTS, has been published in 20 other countries and was made into an Oscar Award-winning film directed by Alexander Payne and starring George Clooney. She lives in Hawaii.

Honu by the Sea—A Musical

10:30 a.m. Sunday May 1
Keiki Stage

Honu By The Sea is a family-friendly underwater musical fantasy produced by Johnson Enos. The show tells the story of a Waikiki surfer-beachboy who finds a magical sea star that grants him a wish to spend a day under the sea. Kainoa the beachboy meets Malia the honu (sea turtle) along with other fascinating creatures including Hula Hoop the octopus, Shaka the crab, Nalu the toothless tiger shark, Surfy the Hawaiian monk seal and Kapper the sea horse. The Broadway-style musical provides lessons on the value of friendship and the virtues of saving the ocean environment through the magic of theater. The show features colorful costumes, lively choreography, stunning orchestration, and endearing songs that enhance the storytelling. [Note: The company has been touring, and its costumes are off-island.]

Adrienne Lois Kaeppler & Christina Hellmich

2:30 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Mission Memorial Auditorium

Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nā Hulu AliʻI is the catalogue accompanying a major recent exhibition at the de Young Museum in San Francisco,  and opening in May at the Los Angeles Count Museum of Art, documents the first comprehensive showing of Hawaiian featherwork mounted on the US mainland. It features rare and stunning examples of some of the finest extant featherwork in the world, including capes and cloaks (ʻahu ʻula), royal staffs of feathers (kāhili), feather lei (lei hulu), helmets (mahiole), and god images (akua hulu), as well as related eighteenth- and nineteenth-century paintings, works on paper, and historical photographs. A unique selection of feather garments, objects, and other works are from the royal Hawaiian collections in the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Honolulu. This lavishly illustrated book explores the central role that these sacred works of art played in the culture and history of the Hawaiian Islands, their unparalleled technical craftsmanship, and an aesthetic tradition unique to the Hawaiian archipelago.

Kaimuki High School Performing Arts Center

Musical: Once On This Island
3:30 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

Kaimuki High School Performing Arts Center offers classes in acting, music, and technical theater at no cost to public school students all over Oahu. The program’s mission is to develop important life skills including discipline, teamwork, creativity, self-awareness, confidence, focus, and appreciation through the performing arts. One of four Department of Education learning centers for performing arts on Oahu, the program and its productions involve about 160 students per school year. Michael Ng, Director.

Lopaka Kapanui

Storytelling
12:30-2 p.m Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

Lopaka Kapanui eagerly shares tales of between-world spirits and Hawaiian mythology with locals and visitors alike. For nearly two decades, he has led after-dark ghost tours around the island of O'ahu. With his theatrical, mesmerizing style, he gives fascinating glimpses into Hawaiian spirituality. Lopaka has published two short story collections, Haunted Hawaiian Nights and The Legend of Morgan’s Corner and Other Tales. His third book, Mysteries of Honolulu, is a compilation of short stories he shared on facebook and is available through Amazon.com as an ebook.

Michael Kieran

Panel: Diamond Sangha Zen in Hawaiʻi
Noon Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Michael Kieran is a Zen Buddhist Master in the Diamond Sangha tradition and
teacher at the Pālolo Zen Center in Honolulu and the Maui Zendo.

Born in 1948 in Sacramento, California, Michael began Zen training in 1974 at the Koko An Zendo in Honolulu under the guidance of Robert Aitken Rōshi. Appointed an apprentice teacher by Aitken Rōshi in 1980. In 1999, a few years after his return to formal practice, Michael was again appointed an apprentice teacher by Aitken Rōshi's Dharma Successor, Nelson Foster, and subsequently received Dharma Transmission from him in 2004.

Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl

11 a.m. Sunday May 1
Authors Mauka

Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl, the author of Hawai‘i Nei: Island Plays, is a well-known Honolulu playwright and writer. Her work has been performed in Hawai‘i and elsewhere in the Pacific, the continental U.S., Britain, and Asia. She is currently the writer and co-producer for the television series "Biography Hawaii."

Arnie Kotler

Panel: Translating the Buddhist Canon into English
11 am Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Arnie Kotler, M.A. UC Berkeley, has been a developmental editor of nonfiction books since 1979, when he helped translator Kazuaki Tanahashi with Moon in a Dewdrop: Writings of Zen Master Dōgen. In 1985, Arnie started Parallax Press and helped craft the lectures and writings of Thich Nhat Hanh and other spiritual teachers into landmark books. In 2005, he founded Koa Books on Maui to publish works on personal transformation, social justice, and Hawai‘i.

Brenda Kwon

Elliot Cades Award for Literature
Noon,
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Born and raised in Hawai‘i, Brenda Kwon is the author of Beyond Ke'eaumoku: Koreans, Nationalism, and Local Culture in Hawai'i; co-editor of YOBO: Korean American Writing in Hawai‘i; and author of The Sum of Breathing, which won Honorable Mention for the 2015 Ka Palapala Po‘okela awards. A 2005 Fulbright Fellow, she has been featured in several journals and anthologies, and she has performed her spoken word poetry locally, nationally, and internationally.

Margaret Read MacDonald

Storyteller
11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Saturday April 30.

12:30-2 p.m.
Sunday May 1

Keiki Stage

Margaret Read MacDonald is known for her playful folktale retellings. Her audience-participation tales engage the entire audience.  Her folktale picture books are a family delight!

Patricia Lee Masters

Panel: Buddhist Meditation and the Rise of Mindfulness
3 pm Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Dr. Patricia Lee Masters, an ordained Buddhist nun, earned a bachelor‘s degree in oriental languages and literature and a master‘s degree in Buddhist and Asian studies at UCLA, a master of public health degree from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and a PhD in political science with a focus on political theory and philosophy/comparative politics from UH Mānoa.

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Bishop Eric Tatsuo Matsumoto

Panel: Japanese Buddhist Adaptations for the Future
4 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Bishop Eric Tatsuo Matsumoto, Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii, graduated form UH Hilo, and attended Ryukoku University Graduate School, Kyoto, where he earned an M.A. in Shin Buddhist Studies. Before assuming the office of Bishop in 2011, he served as minister at Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin Buddhist Temple in Honolulu; as minister of Honokaa, Kamuela, Kohala, and Paauilo Hongwanji Buddhist Temples on the Big Island, and as minister of Moiliili Hongwanji Temple in Honolulu.

Maiana Minahal

Panel: Filipina Writers in Hawaii: Not Just Nurses, Caregivers, Beauty Queens
3 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Maiana Minahal is an interdisciplinary artist, educator, and the author of the poetry collection Legend Sondayo (Civil Defense Poetry 2009). After earning her MFA from Antioch University, she taught at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Minnesota, and colleges in the San Francisco Bay Area; she currently teaches at Kapi'olani Community College in Honolulu. She was born in Manila, and raised in California.

Michael Mohr

Panel: Translating the Buddhist Canon into English
11 am Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Michel Mohr, Ph.D., Geneva, is Chairman of the UH Department of Religion, historian of Buddhism in Japan, and translator of Zen Buddhist texts. His research interests include religious and intellectual history, universalism in Asia, nondenominational approaches to religious practice, and Japanese and Asian religions.

Susanna Moore

11:30 a.m. Sunday May 1, 
Mission Memorial Auditorium

Susanna Moore is the author of the novels The Life of Objects, The Big Girls, One Last Look, In the Cut, Sleeping Beauties, The Whiteness of Bones, and My Old Sweetheart, and two books of nonfiction, Light Years: A Girlhood in Hawai'i and I Myself Have Seen It: The Myth of Hawai'i.

 

Eden-Lee Murray

Emcee, Keiki Stage

A professional actor, director, artist-educator and published writer/editor, Eden-Lee Murray is well known to local theatre audiences. She has directed or performed in every major venue on Oahu, earning multiple Po‘okela Awards for her work. Serving as Education Director at the Hawaii Theatre Center since 2009, it has been her very great pleasure to emcee the fabulous offerings on the Keiki Stage at all 11 HBMF's. 

Rose Nakamura

Panel: Socially Engaged Buddhism
2 pm Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Rose Nakamura grew up in Hilo, and taught health and physical education at UH Hilo, then worked with international students at the East-West Center for 25 years. Upon retiring she co-founded Project Dana (Sanskrit for “selfless giving”) as a small faith-in-action operation based out of Mo‘ili‘ili Hongwanji Mission, with 55 volunteers serving just 110 elderly people at the time. Today, Project Dana has grown into a statewide interfaith coalition of more than 30 churches with over 750 volunteers assisting thousands of senior citizens each year.

Angela Nishimoto

Panel: MsAligned --Male Characters of Female Authors
1 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Makai Pavilion

Angela Nishimoto was raised on the windward side of O‘ahu, teaches on the leeward side, and lives in Honolulu with her husband. She earned her master's degree in botanical science at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She has published fiction in Hawai‘i Pacific Review, Chaminade Literary Review, Kaimana, Hawai‘i Review, Bamboo Ridge, Writing Raw, and elsewhere.

Lorraine Minatoishi Palumbo

Panel: Architectural Adaptations of Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawaiʻi
10 a.m. Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Lorraine Minatoishi Palumbo is President of Minatoishi Palumbo Architects, Inc., Honolulu. She has a B.A. in Architecture from UH Manoa, an M.A. from the University of Oregon School of Architecture, and a doctorate of Engineering from Waseda University, with a dissertation on The Process of Transformation of the Buddhist Temple Architecture of the Japanese Society of Hawaii.

Christy Passion

Noon Sunday May 1.
Authors Makai Pavilion

Christy Passion is a critical care nurse and poet whose works have appeared in local, mainland, and international journals and anthologies, including Crab Creek Review, Haight Ashbury Literary Journal, Blue Collar Review, and Mauri Ola. She received the James A. Vaughn Award for Poetry, the Atlanta Review International Merit Award, and the Academy of American Poetry Award. She co-authored No Choice but to Follow, a collaboration of linked poetry. She works and resides in Honolulu.

Performing Arts Center of Kapolei

Disney Mash-Up
3 pm Sunday May 1.
Keiki Stage

The Performing Arts Center of Kapolei (PACK) a program for students of all ages.

Tony Pisculli

Panel: Inventing Language.
3 p.m.
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Fight Choreography
3:30 pm, Sunday May 1

Keiki Stage

Tony Pisculli is the co-founder and producer of the Hawaii Shakespeare Festival, now entering its 14th season. This summer at HSF he will be presenting an experimental version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in invented language. Actually, in two invented languages, one for the Greek court and mechanicals, and another for the fairies.

James Rumford

Panel: Peace Through Words and Pictures.
10 a.m. Sunday May 1,
Authors Mauka Pavilion

“I grew up in Southern California. I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Chad and Afghanistan. I was a Fulbright lecturer in Rwanda. I have lived in Honolulu for over thirty years. I began writing and illustrating children's books in 1996, with the publication of my first book, The Cloudmakers (Houghton Mifflin). Since that time, I have written and illustrated 16 books and many more are on the way. I am also interested in fine bookmaking and have my own letter press called Manoa Press, founded in 1986. I have published many limited-edition handmade books. “ James Rumford lives in Manoa Valley with his wife and son.

Shawna Yang Ryan

2 p.m. Sunday May 1. Authors Makai Pavilion
4 p.m. Sunday May 1. Authors Makai Pavilion
Panel: Navigating Truth in Fiction & Nonfiction

SHAWNA YANG RYAN is a former Fulbright scholar and the author of Water Ghosts (Penguin Press 2009) and Green Island (Knopf 2016). She teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. Her short fiction has appeared in ZYZZYVA, The Asian American Literary Review,Kartika Review, and The Berkeley Fiction Review. She is the 2015 recipient of the Elliot Cades Emerging Writer award. Originally from California, she now lives in Honolulu.

Pamela Rotner Sakamoto

1 p.m. Sunday May 1,
Authors Mauka pavilion

Pamela Rotner Sakamoto is a respected scholar of Japanese-American relations, is fluent in both English & Japanese. For this book she conducted extensive research in archives, museums, and libraries in both the U.S. and Japan, along with dozens of interviews. She works as an expert consultant on Japan-related projects for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. and has taught in the University of Hawaii System. She teaches history at Punahou School.

Susan M Schultz

Elliot Cades Award for Literature,
Noon, Saturday April 30

Readings:
Tinfish Poets,
3 pm Sunday May 1.

Authors Mauka Pavilion

SUSAN M. SCHULTZ has lived in and worked in Hawai‘i since 1990. She is author of a critical book, A Poetics of Impasse in Modern and Contemporary American Poetry, and several books of poetry and poetic prose. Most recently, Singing Horse Press published Dementia Blog, Memory Cards: 2010-2011 Series and “She’s Welcome to Her Disease”: Dementia Blog, Vol. 2. Vagabond Press published Memory Cards: Dogen Series in their Decibels Series. Schultz founded Tinfish Press in 1995. Tinfish is now in its twentieth year of publishing experimental poetry from the Pacific.

Maya Soetoro-Ng

Panel: Peace Through Words and Pictures
10 a.m. Sunday May 1,
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Maya Soetoro-Ng is the Director of Community Outreach and Global Learning for the Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution at the University of Hawaii in Manoa.  She was awarded a Masters degree in Secondary Education from NYU'sCollege of Education and a PhD in Multicultural Education from the University of Hawaii. For many years, she worked at the University of Hawaii's Collegeof Education where she taught Multicultural Education, Social Studies Methods, and Peace Education at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Lyz Soto

Panel: Filipina Writers in Hawaii: Not Just Nurses, Caregivers, Beauty Queens
3 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Mauka Pavilion

Lyz Soto is a performance poet of Tagalog, Ilocano, Hakka, German, English, Irish, French, Cherokee, Scottish, and Spanish descent. She is Co-Founder of Pacific Tongues and working towards a PhD in English at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Her poem “American Homelands” won the Ian MacMillan poetry prize in 2014.

Joseph Stanton

1 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Mauka pavilion

Joseph Stanton’s five books of poems are Things Seen (published in 2016), A Field Guide to the Wildlife of Suburban O‘ahu, Imaginary Museum: Poems on Art, Cardinal Points: Poems on St. Louis Cardinals Baseball, and What the Kite Thinks: A Linked Poem. His other sorts of books include Looking for Edward Gorey, The Important Books, Stan Musial: A Biography, and A Hawai‘i Anthology. His poems have appeared in Poetry, Harvard Review, Poetry East, New Letters, Cortland Review, Antioch Review, New York Quarterly, Bamboo Ridge, Chaminade Literary Review, Hawai‘i Pacific Review, and many other magazines.

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Rev. Bert Sumikawa

Panel: Buddhist Meditation and the Rise of Mindfulness
3 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Rev. Bert Sumikawa graduated from Marquette University with a degree in zoology, followed by a degree in dentistry, which he practiced for over 40 years. His great-grandfather (in Kobe) and grandfather in Waimea, Kauai) were both Christian ministers. A Catholic convert in his youth, he decided to return to Buddhism and to become a Buddhist Minister. He pursued Tokudo ordination, followed by Kiyoshi. He was assigned first to Kailua Hongwanji, then Kapolei Buddhist Sangha, then Moiliili Hongwanji and Honpa Hongwanji Besuin. He returned to Moiliili Hongwanji where he is at present the senior Minister.

George Tanabe

Emcee and Moderator: Buddhism In Hawai‘i—7 panels
10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday May 1

George Tanabe, Professor Emeritus of Japanese Religion in the UH Department of Religion, received his B.A. in History from Willamette University, an M.A. and Ph.D. in Japanese religion from Columbia University, and an M.A. in Religion from Union Theological Seminary. Dr. Tanabe is author and co-editor of numerous works on Japanese religion and traditions, published by Columbia, Harvard and the University of Hawaii presses. He is co-author with his wife, Dr. Willa Tanabe, of Japanese Temples in Hawaii (UH Press).

Willa Jane Tanabe

Panel: Architectural Adaptations of Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawaiʻi
10 am Sunday May 1.
Buddhism Pavilion

Willa Jane Tanabe graduated from the University of Oregon with a degree in political science. She earned an MA and PhD in East Asian art history with an emphasis on Japanese Buddhist art, at Columbia University,. She taught Japanese and Chinese art at Sophia University in Japan, but spent most of her career (29 years) as a professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Rev. Sherman Thompson

Panel: Buddhism, Christianity and Hawaiian Spirituality
1 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Buddhism in Hawaii

Rev. Sherman Thompson is chaplain at Kamehameha Schools. He grew up in Lahaina, Maui, then attended Kamehameha School in Honolulu as a boarder. After graduating in 1974, he attended Hawaii Pacific University, majoring in Business Administration. After attending seminary through the Hawaii Conference of the United Church of Christ, he was appointed Associate Chaplain in 1997. His ministerial duties include providing spiritual guidance to individuals--young and old, families in need, assistance to corporations and businesses, government agencies, and military branches. He also served churches at Nuuanu Congregational and Kaumakapili.

Lynn Young

Readings from Tinfish
3 p.m. Sunday May 1.
Authors Mauka Pavilion

As an artist, educator, author, and performer Lynn Young (aka Quala-Lynn) has been actively involved in Hawaii’s art communities over thirty years. She has a Bachelors degree in Fine Art and a Masters degree in Creative Writing from UH-Manoa. Lynn currently works with young children as a teaching artist in elementary schools and as a caregiver to elders in their homes. Her book, Where’s My Ritspik?, was published by TinFish Press in 2015.